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Julie Kamlesh Kumar
Brooklyn, NY
Neighborhood: Bedford-Stuyvesant



ARTIST STATEMENT: From the frenetic swinging of lead weights in a sandy landscape to the quiet solidity of an image suspended on the surface of water, my work explores systems, disrupted rule structures, and self-organization. I create compositions in time with computer programs and electronics, build immersive environments that are activated by projected and natural light, and intervene on materials that erode, drip, melt, evaporate, break apart, or float away. My installations are permeable systems that change at irregular intervals. I start with the many until the few can be extracted, developing new responses to each unexpected turn in a process that seems not to emulate, but to materialize, the idea of learning itself.

My art studio is a deeply inefficient laboratory. Experiments unravel and organize themselves into oddly evolved iterations, hypotheses are proven that were never formed, sequences begin in the middle and abruptly stop. Over the last few years I have accumulated a strange blueprint of knowledge that is a byproduct of my studio investigations. I have learned where magenta fluid will go as it flows through an inefficient feedback loop—how floating graphite powder will separate itself into fractured tectonic plates on a bed of still water—how dripping tubes reconstitute solid material back into liquid—what the prismatic haloes of light in a bright yellow room will do if a cloud passes in front of the sun.

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Water is Taught by Thirst

Water is Taught by Thirst
Steel cables, fluorescent lights, mixed media
Room dimensions: 15' x 18' x 14'
2013

This installation was created on site in the Gelman Gallery of the Rhode Island School of Design Museum in 2013. Steel cables under tension stretch from wall to wall in a three-part structure that changes angles in midair. Populated with fluorescent lights, clear tubing filled with fluid, extensions cords, cables, rope, string, fabric, paper, wood, and plastic, the dizzying array merges with the architecture of the surrounding space.

The Whole of it Came Not at Once


The Whole of it Came Not at Once
Monofilament, staples, paper
Dimensions variable
2013

The framework for this piece is a grid of monofilament that fills a 10' x 12' x 10' space. Inside the grid, clusters of color-coded crumpled paper are suspended, as though they were trapped in a singular moment in time. They were originally dropped into position from two specific points at the top of the grid. Their final resting point was not interfered with in order to reveal specific patterns of interference and disturbance.

A Single Hour of the Day (2:47 PM)


A Single Hour of the Day (2:47 PM)
Sunlight, monofilament, staples
Dimensions variable
2013

Sunlight streams through two apertures in a wall and interacts with a 10' x 12' x 12' grid made out of monofilament. Because the grid is tilted, viewers can enter and see it from beneath or walk through to the far wall. As the day progresses the environment changes, from subtle camera obscura projections to saturated pinpoints of reflected light on the ground. The light on the grid is contingent: it changes as the viewer changes location, so two people looking at it from two sides can't agree on what they see.

An Imitation of a Light


An Imitation of a Light
Daylight, tubing, water pumps, fluorescent lights, programmed electronics, mixed media
Room dimensions: 15' x 15' x 10'; Wall dimensions: 10' x 12' x 4"
2013

An Imitation of a Light is a looming wall of matter, extruding from a slanted opening cut into the far wall of a saturated yellow room. The wall is organized around a gradient of material, transitioning from reflective and translucent materials like clear plastic, thread, and glass to opaque materials like painted canvas strips, rope, string, metal, chains, and paper. The piece is activated by the motion of hot pink fluid pumping through tubing that weaves throughout the wall. Lights embedded in the far end of the wall - nearest the natural light - turn on at night.

then space began to toll


then space began to toll
Projected animation, programmed electronics, water pumps, glass, water, graphite, fluorescent tubes, oil
Actual duration: 11 minutes
2012

then space began to toll is an electronic installation in which a sequence of events occur over a duration of eleven minutes. All of the components are automated and require no intervention, except for the initial triggering of the piece. A projected animation, calibrated to the objects in the room, draws lines and reveals select parts of the installation as it progresses. This is synced to physical events, such as light bulbs turning on, water dripping into tanks, flashing light boxes, and water pouring from the ceiling.

I measure every grief I meet


I measure every grief I meet
White glue, tubing, water, air
Dimensions Variable
2012

In this piece, large glue membranes embedded with clear tubing are suspended from the ceiling. Water is pumped through the circuitry at programmed intervals, allowing trapped air to activate the piece with subtle bubbling motion. In a few areas water leaks through pin-sized holes in the tubing, runs down the glue, and drips down onto the ground. The water paths leave a complex network of reconstituted glue in their wake, eventually re-forming the system through the process of erosion.


 








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