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Ann Rosen
ASBURY PARK, NJ
Neighborhood: Park Slope



ARTIST STATEMENT: My primary focus is to photograph people, capturing a mutuality that cuts through race, gender, class and diversity. I’ve sought out subjects and venues that directly address these concerns throughout my career. In 2012, I began research on women’s oppression by reading on the subject of women, homelessness and mental illness. I discovered that, “Widespread homelessness among mentally ill New Yorkers became a fact of life in the 1980s due in large part to the combination of a huge loss of low-cost housing through gentrification and the failure of policy makers to create adequate community-based care for mentally ill people released from long-term hospitalizations.” http://www.projectrenewal.org/mental_health.html Homelessness as described above continues today, often reaching crisis levels. As a professional photographer and former public school art teacher, I understood the value of learning these subjects for the women who reside in the Park Slope Women’s Shelter. This shelter is a part of CAMBA, “that operates this, and other, homeless shelters for mentally ill, substance-abusing women at the Park Slope Armory in Brooklyn. The Park Slope Women’s Shelter enables mentally ill and often substance-abusing women to stabilize their condition and move toward permanent and/or supported housing.” http://www.coalitionforthehomeless.org/pages/basic-facts-about-homelessness-new-york-city-data-and-charts Creativity is an effective way to stimulate the brain and benefit mental health. There is much documentation of how photography and art can help people express experiences that are too difficult to put into words. The instability of shelter living wears on these women’s souls. The outlet of painting, making a collage or learning digital photography, gives them tools that can reduce their anxiety and is a refuge from the intense emotions associated with their mental illness. Through this work, I’m aware of the qualities these women offer to themselves and to me as we work, side by side, in the art studio. Through our discussions during class, I learn how they cope with their disabilities and struggle to recreate their lives. Moving into an apartment is paramount. Shelter, as with anyone, is their first step for getting back on track. Rapid re-entry into the community minimizes the impact of their homelessness. In my photographs, these are women are subjects calling on us—the observers—to consider our relationship with them and ponder the dichotomy between subject and viewer. These are women, who despite their circumstances have the same dreams and aspirations as everyone.
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  • Miriam, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Tatiana, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Sheryl, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Anita, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Dee, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Tillie, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Sally, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Mary, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Angela, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Terry, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Sharon, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Stephanie, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Tess, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Shelley, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Jame, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2017
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Penny, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Zee, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Patricia, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Delia, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2016
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph

  • Sara, from In the Presence of Women: Living in Shelter
    2015
    Archival Digital Black and White Photograph
 








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